He’s Commitment Phobic

Primavera, 24x24, oil on panel

Primavera, 24×24, oil on panel by Richard J Demato

He dug so perfectly well
and worked very hard,
but as soon as he came to the water of life,
he went from being so good
to being very bad.
He took to his heels as fast as he could,
and lost the nourishment that all
his work was supposed to bring.
Isn’t it unfortunate that a well-digger is dying of thirst
because of his fear of water?


Brief Analysis: When a man hops from woman to woman, he lives a very empty, unfulfilled life. “Digging through a well” is used as a metaphor for having sex in this short poem. It’d be silly, of course, or stupid, to think that is all a woman- a whole magnificent being- is good for. If you are lucky enough to get a woman who loves you and is willing to be and stay with you, it’d be unfortunate to not appreciate that, and recognize that with her by your side, there is nothing you can’t do.
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My Sister Has Six Legs

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by Tim Okamura

Don’t ever make a conclusion on a person’s character or self, solely based on hearsay. If you would not believe that my sister has six legs simply because I’ve said so, until you see a picture of her and her six legs, don’t conclude that a person is an angel, a devil or something else in-between because someone else has told you to.

I don’t have a sister that has six legs.

If I had told you that my sister had a leg instead, you probably would have believed it because it sounds very realistic that a person would have just one. Then you tell someone else that my sister has just one leg and (she had an accident when she was four or she had an infection or whatever you come up with). The dissemination cycle continues- they tell someone else, and the someone else tells someone else. Now, everyone is beginning to look at me strangely because my sister has one leg and I ate the other one. Everyone is being mean to me because I eat human flesh, and they don’t want to be eaten. No one has taken any of the information or gossip with a grain of salt.

Well, I don’t have a sister at all. 

26+ Questions to Consider in a Love Relationship

osun

“Osun” [Artist Unknown]

Ask yourself these questions about your significant other:

1. Do they make me feel safe?
2. Do they make me feel anxious?
3. Do they make me feel less than they are, or do they make me feel like their equal?
4. Do they boost my self-esteem or kill it?
5. Do they make me smile or laugh?
6. Do they appreciate my talents and work, however amateur?
7. Has this person shown me that I can trust them?
8. Would I consider them a good person?
9. Are they appreciative?
10. Are they loving/caring?
11. Do they respect me?
12. Do they apologize whenever they are wrong?
13. Do they want what’s best for them, or what’s best for us?
14. Do they understand me, or have a desire to?
15. Do they want to hear me speak, and do they listen when I do?
16. Do they make plans to see me and stick to them?
17. Do we share similar values?
18. Have they hinted that they are not interested in a relationship?
19. Have I been honest with what I’m looking for in a partner?
20. Am I just lonely or do I enjoy spending time with them?
21. Do I think they’re physically attractive? Is that the only reason I like them?
22. If I was in trouble, could I call this person and ask for help?
23. Do I think he/she loves me? How have they shown it to me that they do, if they claim to?
24. Has this person physically or verbally abused me, directly or indirectly?
25. Would I trust this person to be around my children?
26. What does this person lack that I said I really wanted in a partner? Would I be okay/happy without it?


Written by Reid [emeraldlotus.ca] + Aderonke [writething.ca]

Lady Justice’s Husband

lj

Lady Justice’s husband
is a White supremacist.
He grabs her breasts
and bites her ears,
slaps her buttocks
and wipes her tears,
tells her he loves her
and calms her fears,
and in the mornings,
she does whatever the hell
she’s asked to do.

I’m Not Your Little Negro Girl

He wants to be my knight.
I have noticed his random displays of might.
He gazes at me seductively whenever I’m in sight,
but all I can predict is a sorry plight.
How can you be the one that I’d keep warm at night
if you don’t think everyone should be treated right?

Too Rich to Give

Poverty in the Midst of Plenty (1939)

Poverty in the Midst of Plenty (1939) by Gerard Sekoto

A poor man wakes up feeling hungry and useless.
A rich man prefers to have his meat boneless.
The poor man eats out of the rich man’s bins, homeless.
The rich man blames him for it, but the poor man is faultless.

Poor man only wants some food; he’s harmless.
He has told rich man many times- it’s countless.
He needs rich man’s attention; he’s helpless,
but rich man doesn’t care, he’s loveless.

Does wealth make a person heartless?
Someone, tell me, ’cause I’m clueless.
Does it kill a person’s sense of fairness?
Does it make a human being think less?

‘Ungolden’ Silence

Silence is not always golden.
Speak wisely, especially when
you see abuse or unfairness,
at the right moment,
and to the right people.

“Tick”

“Tick” goes the clock,
“tick, tick”.
What you have to do,
do quick.

“Tick” goes the clock,
“tick, tick”.
What you have to stop,
stop quick.

This is What Friends are For

To hold your hands and dry your tears,
to cheer you on as you strive to soar,
to reduce your worries and calm your fears,
these and more, are what friends are more.

The Representation of the Working Class in the Media

Peasant with a Wheelbarrow by Jean Francois Millet

“Peasant with a Wheelbarrow” by Jean Francois Millet

Nollywood movies, to begin with, are now increasingly becoming movies for the rich. Look at the “normal”, sophisticated settings that are used for the produced plays- beautiful sofas, expensive paintings, large compounds, one or more workers, expensive clothes, suggestions/mentions of easy access to foreign countries… I don’t need to keep counting. The actors, who often are members of the working class in essence themselves, tend to promote the upper-class as ideal.

The realities of working-class families are barely ever represented, and when they are, they are presented as comedies- situations to be laughed at or mocked- lots of children, dirty wives and numerous exchange of words. Gatemen or security guards, in Yoruba Nollywood movies, to be specific, are represented as extremely retarded. Even when they suffer gross levels of workplace abuses, the audience is tempted to even insult them more, and laugh- “ha ha ha”.

When these realities don’t appear as a comedy, they are presented as pitiful- a character is presented as either suffering so terribly, experiencing an illness or the death of a loved one, or as being very close to death, and suddenly, by the end of the movie, they would “magically” [usually by some sort of unrealistic luck] become members of the upper class.

"Bouquet' by an unknown artist

Being a member of the working/lower class is seen as extremely pathetic; something to be avoided at all cost. No honest, hard-working member of the working class is ever presented as truly happy. They never enjoy the joys of being with family; they never go to parties as normal people or possess dignity in their labour. They are only made to serve the rich in many plays; their own achievements- no matter how “little” or “basic” they might be to the members of the upper class- are never shown/celebrated, until, of course, they become members of the upper class.

Even when the working-class members of the audience can relate to the produced stories, they often find it really hard to relate to the rich settings and everything else that they are presented with.
No one is taking the bus except they are about to be kidnapped; no one is in the market buying foodstuff; no one is wearing simple clothes… It does terrible things to the subconscious in the long run- feelings of worthlessness, to begin with.

The general media is becoming more race-conscious and class-blind (in the aforementioned way), and it’s sick. It’s quite sick.